An Interview with Gloria Anzaldúa

"She puts history through a sieve, winnows out the lies, looks at the forces that we as a race, as women, have been a part of.  . . She reinterprets history and, using new symbols, she shapes new myths. She adopts new perspectives toward the darkskinned, women and queers. She strengthens her tolerance (and intolerance) for ambiguity. She is willing to share, to make herself vulnerable to foreign ways of seeing and thinking. She surrenders all notions of safety, of the familiar. Deconstruct, construct. She becomes a nahual, able to transform herself into a tree, a coyote, into another person. She learns to transform the small "I" into the total self."

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Check Your Allyship

"My U.S. citizenship grants me privileges. It allows me to travel from the United States to El Salvador with relative ease. I have to pay $10 for a tourist card, because although I travel there every two years and and have dozens of relatives in the country, it’s not considered my “legal” home. When I visit my Abuela Carmen, whose home sits between tropical trees and gleaming green leaves, I tell her that I’ll see her soon. And because international mobility is not treated as the human right it should be, telling Abuela that I’ll see her again is a privilege."

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Today's Google Doodle Sends Another Important Political Message

"Anzaldúa focused her life's work on exploring these themes. After attending Pan American University and earning a master's degree in English and Education at the University of Texas, she taught in bilingual and special education programs. Then, she started writing, funneling her voice and experiences into bestselling works of feminist, queer, and cultural theory. According to the Poetry Foundation, Anzaldúa is best known for her 1987 book Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza and subsequent essay, “La Prieta.""

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The Lenny Interview: Isabel Allende

"The following is a deeply personal and revealing conversation with the author, who is 73 and recently single. When we come to the topic of unconditional love, a theme in her book, Allende tells me it is impossible to have unconditional love in a romantic relationship. Allende loves her dog unconditionally, she says, but never the man she's sleeping with."

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Kathryn SwintIsabel Allende
Life’s Work: An Interview with Isabel Allende

"Isabel Allende conceived her first novel, The House of the Spirits, as a letter to her dying grandfather. Although it became an international best seller, she would write one more successful book before feeling secure enough to quit her day job. Her catalog now spans more than 20 titles, including The Japanese Lover, released last year."

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Kathryn SwintIsabel Allende
Why young women are so upset at Madeleine Albright and Gloria Steinem, explained

"Unlike in her first shot at the presidency, Hillary Clinton has centered her second White House run on the allure of electing the nation’s first woman president. It’s a pitch she makes often, usually ending her speeches by conjuring an image of America in which "a father can tell his daughter, ‘Yes, you can be anything you want to be, even president of the United States.’""

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Madeleine Albright: 'All of a Sudden, Diplomacy Is Being Degraded'

"Madeleine Albright—who as secretary of state in the Clinton administration presided over one of the last diplomatic breakthroughs with North Korea, visiting Pyongyang to negotiate directly with Kim Jong Il—argued on Thursday that the organization she used to lead is being hollowed out just when the United States needs it most. Today, it confronts a North Korean nuclear-weapons program that, under Kim Jong Il’s son Kim Jong Un, has rapidly advanced to the point of directly threatening the United States."

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Madeleine Albright Discusses Her Jewish Background And Her New Book, ‘Prague Winter’

"In the 11 years since she held one of the highest positions in American government as secretary of state, Madeleine Albright has been a professor, Democratic campaigner, grandmother and founder of an international business consulting firm. And she’s authored books on national politics, foreign relations and her famous collection of brooches and pins."

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